Tag: lungo

Give your coffee some Ooh La La with a Cafetiere!

We all remember our first fancy coffee, right? The time where the coffee is not just that little bit different from what you’d expected, and all that more thrilling for it.

For me it was on a regular after school natter with my best mate, Victoria, at the then newly opened Willows Restaurant in St John’s Place, Perth. Back then they served all their coffees rather elegantly in cafetieres. And the sheer novelty value and fun of plunging the coffee was something neither of us had experienced before. So very cosmopolitan and grown up it seemed to two giddy 16-year-olds.

Fast forward 30 years and Willows is, rightly, celebrating its third decade in business at the heart of Perth. Cafetieres, however, have slightly fallen out of favour amongst the coffee elite in the last three decades but, despite this snobbery, I’ll hazard a guess that there’s one in every home up and down the country. In fact, if you ask, Willows will still serve you up a cafetiere coffee and is one of a very few cafes that still do.

As a piece of speciality coffee brewing kit, the cafetiere still means business, no matter how fashions move on. My very first Bodum was given to me by colleagues as leaving gift in 1998 and is still going strong almost 25 years later. Furthermore, and I’m not ashamed to admit it, when it comes to sharing a brew, it’s my go to brewing kit – trouncing v60s, aeropress and espresso machines each and every time for its casual coffee table glamour and simplicity.

The best brewing results come from using fresh coarse ground coffee (and Aonach Mhor is perfect made in a cafetiere) and hot water that’s just off the boil. You can vary serving according to desired strength but I’ve always used the two fingers method to measure out the coffee. I can almost hear the coffee elite’s teeth grinding at the thought of this utter abandonment of scientific measurement.

The bloom in a cafetiere, where the grinds rise up and the bubbles gather on the top, is one of my favourite moments in making coffee. A quick stir then you need a few minutes to let the coffee steep, and finally you are ready to plunge and serve. It’s quick, it’s simple, and it’s exactly why (I bet) it’s still a winner all these years later. Why not pop into Willows this Summer to celebrate their 30th anniversary and order yourself a brew.

Article First Published in The Menu Magazine on 9/07/2022 in The Courier and Press & Journal

 

Ice, Ice, baby.

As I write, Scotland is sweltering in the grip of an early Summer heatwave. Beside me is a clinking high ball glass, filled to the brim with deliciously ice-cold coffee, my inspiration for this month’s column.

Like a grown-up milkshake, with the added value of caffeination, an iced coffee is the ultimate sophisticated treat when the sun is out.

Across the globe, the iced coffee trade is literally booming. Fuelled by the big international chains, and much coveted by the cool kids, these (often) sugary sweet, cream-laden summer brews are more than a contender when it comes to getting cut through in a crowded summer soft drinks market. And the good news is they don’t have to be dessert-like to taste divine.

I’m a big fan of the Italian “granita” style lattes, which only requires milk, a shot of coffee, and some ice in a blender to be brought to life with the minimum of fuss.

For those who prefer to follow trends, and like a bit more drama in their drinks, the Dalgona Coffee surged in popularity in 2020 when it became a bit of an Instagram/TikTok hit during the first lockdown. Essentially a whipped creamy coffee layer sitting on top of ice-cold milk, there are hundreds of variations of the drink and more than a definite nod to artistry when it comes to presentation.

Unlike iced tea, iced coffee can taste just as good served white, as it can black – although I’ve often found a black iced coffee to be a little more of a bitter drink, rather than a refreshing one. A quest to eliminate the bitterness is why cold brew coffee has risen in popularity over the last decade, where the coffee brews slowly in cold water over a period of about 12 hours, and you pop it into the fridge to chill until you’re ready to drink. It’s a smooth alternative, if you have the patience, which I don’t if the cold brew Puck Puck at the back of my cupboard is anything to go by.

Still, a huge variety of options awaits you when you venture into the iced coffee market, so don’t be afraid to experiment. Take it from me, sitting under a parasol, in beautiful Scottish sunshine, day-dreaming I’m in Venice, enjoying an iced latte made with Bheinn Mhor: there’s nothing better.

Article First Published in The Menu Magazine on 11/06/2022 in The Courier and Press & Journal

 

Stronger is better, right?

I’ve got news for you. You’ve been poorly trained in how to buy coffee. Yep, you’ve read that right.

In a bid to make things simpler for you, the supermarkets dug out the most basic of marketing techniques, and have adequately lulled you into a false sense of security using a fictional numbers based coffee strength spectrum. You’ve probably already decided you have a preference for a Strong Dark 5 or a Weak Gentle 3 and that’s that. But it’s all nonsense.

That “caffeine laden dark roast” you’ve been boasting about on social media is not actually as caffeine laden as you might think. And certainly not as caffeinated as the light roast you eschewed because it wasn’t “strong” enough to get your revs up in the morning.

Fact: the coffee roasting process actively removes caffeine. That means the darker the roast, or the longer the bean is roasted, the less caffeine it retains.

The art of the roaster is in toasting the beans at the right level, for the right amount of time, to balance out their natural acidity, sweetness and bitterness, while also retaining the coffee’s natural flavours. No small feat.

The lighter the roast, the more of the bean’s original flavours are retained. This sometimes comes with higher levels of acidity (often translated into coffee descriptions as fruitiness) but lower levels of bitterness.

Most artisan roasters lean towards creating lighter roasts because these bring out the natural flavours of the coffee.

It’s designed to make your coffee drinking experiences more akin to that of fine wine discovery, where different grapes, grown in different vineyards, picked by different winemakers, make different wines.

It also means that those darker roasts you think are pumped full of caffeine are actually more bitter, not less. Because we’re quite fond of a milky coffee in the UK, the darker roasts generally sold in coffee shops get away with their bitterness. Ask the Americano drinkers, however, and you might get a different spin on things.

So if you need more caffeine (and taste), why not step back into the light and start exploring lighter roasts which may surprise you – and keep you awake for longer. Check out our Aonach Mhor for a gentle entry into the world of lighter roasts.

Article First Published in The Menu Magazine on 14/05/2022 in The Courier and Press & Journal

Black Gold

How do you take your coffee? Black. No sugar.

It’s the line in the movie that lets you know this is someone not to be messed with. They don’t have time for milk. Certainly no time for sugar.

Last month I fessed up that latte is my drink of choice. But don’t be fooled. I’ve always been a bit of a maverick when it comes to how I take my coffee. It depends what mood I’m in. I’m as partial to an espresso as I am a latte.

If you truly want to taste the coffee, and I mean really taste it, then ditch the milk.

At the heart of most coffees is an Espresso, a small, strong (and quick!) serve with a lovely foamy crema on top.

Here’s the magic part. Add water to that Espresso, and you’ve got yourself an Americano.  Flip that round and add an Espresso to some water, you’ve made yourself a Long Black, an Australian serve rapidly gaining popularity in the UK.  You’ll have to trust me when I say they do not taste the same. Honest.

And don’t mistake the Long Black with the Lungo (also a “long” black), which is where you extract a longer coffee, rather than simply add hot water to a coffee already extracted. Confused?

The truth is, black coffee isn’t boring. There are so many methods of extraction to try and it’s the only way to truly taste the coffee exactly as it is.

The impact of brewing methods on what you drink is not to be understated and, if you like black coffee, definitely something to be explored.

This month I’ve been sampling for our new roast, The Bheinn Mhor. It’s one of our darkest roasts and the black coffee serves have really showcased its complex flavours of raisins and nuttiness. It’s great with milk in it too, but that’s fundamentally a completely different drink. In the same way that whisky and coke is no longer just whisky.

If you’re feeling really adventurous, try a Ristretto. Made with the same amount of coffee as an Espresso, but using two thirds the amount of water, it packs a mighty tiny punch. The Italians, however, are more likely to chuck the Ristretto over some vanilla ice cream to create the fabulous Affogato dessert. And just like that, we’re back to milk.

Article First Published in The Menu Magazine on 09/04/2022 in The Courier and Press & Journal